After Trying To Sell For 5 Years, Will 2013 Finally Be The Time? 920 W. Barry In Lakeview

We last chattered about this top floor 3-bedroom at 920 W. Barry in Lakeview in April of 2012.

See our prior chatter here.

At that time, it had been on and off the market for 4 years and I asked if it would finally sell in 2012.

The answer was “no.”

But with the market heating up, it has come back on the market to try again.

This time, it’s priced just $900 under the 2012 list price at $549,000.

If you recall, at 2000 square feet, it has two outdoor spaces including a front terrace and a private roofdeck.

The unit is “extra wide” at 34 feet.

It has luxury finishes including Bosch and Viking appliances in the kitchen and marble baths.

Will it have better luck this year?

Pamela Rueve at Coldwell Banker has the listing again. See the pictures here.

Unit #5: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2000 square feet

  • Sold in July 2004 for $605,000
  • Originally listed in December 2007 for $689,000
  • Reduced numerous times
  • Was listed in April 2012 at $549,900
  • Withdrawn in April 2012
  • Currently listed at $549,000
  • Assessments now $313 a month (they were $325 a month last year)
  • Taxes now $9120 (they were $9000 last year)
  • Central Air
  • Washer/Dryer in the unit
  • Garage parking
  • Bedroom #1: 15×15
  • Bedroom #2: 12×12
  • Bedroom #3: 11×11

 

78 Responses to “After Trying To Sell For 5 Years, Will 2013 Finally Be The Time? 920 W. Barry In Lakeview”

  1. Nice unit, but I assume no elevator. Walking up to the fourth floor has got to get old.
    Three bedrooms are great for families with kids, but trying to get kids up those stairs would be a battle.
    Decent place inside, but the downsides outweigh the up.
    I’m just not sure who is the market for this.
    If I’m wrong and there is an elevator,that’s a different matter.

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  2. “No need for health club; unit includes manual stairmaster…”

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  3. “Nice unit, but I assume no elevator. Walking up to the fourth floor has got to get old.”

    What do they have to price it at to make up for the stairs?

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  4. I get the stair issue, but really it’s not that bad with a kid. Ideal, no, but nothing is. If I were to do it again, i’d choose top floor with the extra stairs for two main reasons:
    1.) No one above you
    2.) Security – it’s prob the safest unit and if somone were to get in the building, they aren’t going to the top.

    For a top floor extra wide unit, the stairs are not that big of a deal.

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  5. Sabrina, I think the stairs rules it out for families with small kids. Forget pricing it as a three bedroom. Realistically, it is a one bedroom with a lot of space.

    Another note — buildings like this are a concern based on condo-related issues. With buildings this small, one problem owner can make things a major problem for the rest. One unit owner gets behind on assessments, and then heck breaks lose as the owners need funds for maintenance. I’ve seen it happen with some of the buildings I work with. It can be challenging, but all buildings of this size have that issue.

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  6. Masonic is planning to build on the empty lot across the street at some point. That is something my friends who owned in the Barry Quad said. That can’t be helping either.

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  7. 510k-525k should get it done in this market…unless the building is all rental, financing issues with 50% limit.

    Easy to attain info regarding association finances/conditions.

    Top floor is a trade off. It’s a walk, but also the quietest unit. Not ideal with small children but many families in the city make it work. I don’t get the aversion to exercise on this site. People want to live close to the lake (to look at?) but don’t want to walk a block to the EL or up three flights of stairs.

    Now poor a pint and get ready for this asteroid flyby.

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  8. “Masonic is planning to build on the empty lot across the street at some point.”

    You mean, like, *now*?

    http://www.rejournals.com/2013/02/12/construction-starts-for-advocate-illinois-masonic-medical-center/

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  9. ” I don’t get the aversion to exercise on this site. People want to live close to the lake (to look at?) but don’t want to walk a block to the EL or up three flights of stairs.”

    Well who wants to waste their day with a 30 minute roundtrip walk if you forgot something in the car, or to get the mail?

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  10. The same knucklehead who paid 605 for this in 2004. You forgot groceries too.

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  11. “You forgot groceries too”

    Well, yeah, being only able to carry one plastic bag at a time up those stairs, it’s take about 8 hours to haul everything up, after a big shoppping trip. Will peapod bring stuff up to the top floor?

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  12. “Well who wants to waste their day with a 30 minute roundtrip walk if you forgot something in the car, or to get the mail?”

    5 minutes per flight of stairs? Seriously.

    If the rooftop is private, why are there FIVE satellite dishes up there? I’d be bothered by that and tell my downstairs neighbors no.

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  13. Better clear the whole day if you have a kid with you. At least it’s close to Leona’s.

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  14. “Well who wants to waste their day with a 30 minute roundtrip walk if you forgot something in the car, or to get the mail?”

    If it is a 30 minute walk for 4 flights of stairs for you, then you need this place because you desperately need the exercise.

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  15. “If it is a 30 minute walk for 4 flights of stairs for you”

    No, that’s 15 minutes for 4 flights of stairs. And that’s the the typical cc’r who thinks that 4 blocks is a 25 + minute walk.

    Is today irony-impairment day?

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  16. Yeah I was going to comment on those dishes, what an eyesore, put them on the south face of the building, or have 1 community dish for the whole building (it can be done)

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  17. “put them on the south face of the building”

    Nah, south face of the roof access ‘hut’. Which is right above the ac compressors, so there’s some stuff already running from there to each unit. But you know how f&*^ing lazy those D* installers are–never do anything right, when there’s any easy alternative that will still work–so, run ‘em down the back, and drill a hole through the exterior wall directly into each unit.

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  18. “I don’t get the aversion to exercise on this site”

    I completely agree. DEAL WITH IT. It makes me sad that the availability of an elevator is probably one of the first things that goes through the American homebuyer’s head when looking at these top floor walk ups. If someone is fat and/or lazy enough to pass this up because of a lack of an elevator then fine, I wouldn’t want him/her living in my building anyway. I live on the 3rd floor of walk up building like this and I like the exercise. It takes me less than 45 seconds to get up to the third floor of my walkup. Even shorter if I do 2 stairs per-step. I can carry about 5 grocery bags (plastic) per hand so the “bringing up groceries” argument is, again, invalid and rooted in lethargy. If I had kids, I’d want to own the top floor in a building like this, and if there were an elevator I’d still make them walk! We’re already a nation of obese, high fructose corn syrup addicts.

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  19. “have 1 community dish for the whole building (it can be done)”

    what do you do with the other 4 dishes then? Birdbath?

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  20. “what do you do with the other 4 dishes then? Birdbath?”

    In the alley for the scrapers. They love ‘em.

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  21. That’d be two ‘p’s, not one.

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  22. I agree that the number of stairs would hold back the majority of likely buyers. I don’t think it’s a matter of laziness, but a third floor unit in a regular width (and accordingly priced) unit, would be an easy sell—yes, some would prefer a second floor, but many would appreciate the benefit of the added light, roof access, better views, and lack of upstairs neighbors to offset the inconvenience of another flight of stairs.

    But here, it’s a flight of stairs up to the first floor entrance, PLUS three more flights of stairs (and with a newer building, presumably each floor has higher ceilings, so perhaps a few more steps per flight). And, this sized unit is likelier to appear to someone with kids or planning them shortly, so there are few of those that wouldn’t at least have some misgivings about the number of stairs. Also, they’d be right to be concerned about how long it would take to resell, down the road, if they do any due diligence or read this site!

    Sabrina is right—there’s a price at which it will find that unique buyer, and it’s a great unit. But not a quick sale without more discounting.

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  23. needs a floorplan. If the LR/DR, kitchen, baths and all 3 bedrooms are on the Main Level, then what are these?

    Other Room 1: 16X08, Main Level

    Other Room 2: 32X18, Upper Level

    Other Room 3: 27X06, Main Level

    How can this be only 2000 sf? This is a duplex up right?

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  24. from redfin:

    Additional Room #1
    •Balcony
    •Size: 16X08
    •On Main Level

    Additional Room #2
    •Deck
    •Size: 32X18
    •On 2nd Level

    Additional Room #3
    •Terrace
    •Size: 27X06
    •On Main Level

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  25. Elliott, I have no beef with you, but I do want to point out that your argument is more or less “I can walk up 3-4 flights of stairs, therefore, everyone can or is too lazy” is a total logical fallacy. You even go on to say that if you have kids you would want them to have a top floor unit, which by your own admission, gives your argument zero credibility.

    I lived in a 3rd floor walk up, with children, for a number of years. And it sucked. Totally sucked and I will never do it again. I more or less had to haul everything up and down stairs every day. Infants in car seats, toddlers who are crying, older kids who are tired/sleeping, strollers, cat litter, multiple gallons of whole milk every week, christmas gifts, food, everything. and of course, all of your garbage leaves the same way too. And if you forget something or have to make multiple trips, it can be taxing to carry all of that. And the other issue, coming from some one with early stages of repetitive stress syndrome, grabbing and holding on to all that weight, often in uncomfurtable and unerognomic grips, really started to hurt my hands. Carrying heavy bags with a grip on the knot on the top of bag is not comfortable and carrying it from one end of the lot to the other and down three flights of stairs is not fun. I lived in third floor walk-ups most of the last 12 years until I bought a ranch in the burbs, and the difference is marvelous. Kids love it too .

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  26. Nice looking unit. It seems very sunny, and I love the outdoor space. Not my preferred location, however, and if Masonic indeed has plans for across the street I’d be quite wary. It’s the Masonic complex, along with the sheer 1980s strip-malled ugliness of Clark Street at this point, that turn me off to the location.

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  27. “if Masonic indeed has plans for across the street”

    There is no “if”:

    http://www.rejournals.com/2013/02/12/construction-starts-for-advocate-illinois-masonic-medical-center/

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  28. Who worries about stairs? The listing says the heated garage on the the top floor, so you can drive up!
    “…w/heated attached garage nestled on top floor so no unit is above.”

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  29. “I don’t think it’s a matter of laziness” -If not, then, as you said, it has be fear about how difficult it could be to resell to future lazy buyers.

    “But here, it’s a flight of stairs up to the first floor entrance, PLUS three more flights of stairs (and with a newer building, presumably each floor has higher ceilings”

    ::facepalm::

    So an extra 5 seconds to get up the entrance steps, plus 15 seconds to account for additional 2-3 steps per flight. Maybe the HOA can budget in a hydraulic wheelchair lift that extends out to the sidewalk and goes all the way to the front door. Or maybe have it go all the way to the CTA stop. It would be really expensive, but would really help resale!!

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  30. Elliot, do you have small kids? You seem to have no clue what it is like to have them.

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  31. I, too, lived in a walk-up building for many years. Can one do it? Sure. Is it a pain? Most of the time. We traded the stairs for more space, a unit that we loved, and a great location. But to blithely note the number of seconds it takes to walk up and down ignores the reality of schlepping stuff up and down day in and day out. And let’s not forget remodeling or moving, both of which were quite a bit more costly due to the time involved in dealing with the stairs. It can get to be a real drag. So there is a stair discount IMO, and it’s not because people are lazy. The potential buyer here is going to have to really want the roof deck and feel they will use it (it can often be a pain to get to/from the roof deck, let alone get stuff up/down). And don’t get me started on small associations….

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  32. Heck, I’m a 30-something male in relatively good shape, exercise regularly, have no children and I have no interest in a fourth floor walk up.

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  33. What a bunch of whiny pussies. The 3rd floor would be worth it, because you don’t have anyone living above you and that’s worth far more $$$, and you have skylights. I also agree on the security issue, no worries about flooding. The top floor is the most VALUABLE unit, there is no “discount”.

    Doesn’t anyone here work out? Has anyone here ever spent considerable time skiing? How about trudging up the side of a mountain with boots on? having to deal with putting on skis, boots and bindings on the side of a mountain when it’s snowing? What about all these yuppie triathletes and marathoners? All that pilates and yoga cost? what good is it all? Bunch of wimps, I say! What about living in a place like SF, CA where the mere sidewalks are formidable? Think about our soliders in the Middle East. WTF!

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  34. Homedelete,
    Who said an internet rant needs credibility behind it? :-)
    I understand how biased my comments are given that I am younger, and I certainly don’t expect those who are older or have health issues to be able to perform such activity as easily as myself. Not being a parent also contributes to reduced empathy for those who have kids so I will admit to that. I know (from stories and observation) how difficult it can be raising kids, and I didn’t mean to personally offend you by marginalizing how it can be a pain in the ass to carry stuff up and down constantly, particularly with kids. Getting furniture up to my place isn’t fun so I can relate, but I suppose it’s worth the trade off of living in the “penthouse” unit. In regards to this theme of “exercise aversion” clearly evident in the subtext of many cribchatter posts, people were raising kids in walk up units before they were being built with elevators and now the middle class families (or most likely upper middle class for a unit like this) *need* the elevator. I guess it all depends on the environment in which you’re raised and what sort of amenities you expect in your life. Re: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

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  35. Helmet –
    I can’t believe I’m saying this, but for once I actually “thumbs up-ed” your post.

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  36. “Hierarchy of Needs” quoting that psycho-babble crap? http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Abraham_Maslow.jpg

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  37. Does this building have split stone sides? See them on the rooftop doorway.

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  38. Other multi-story buildings like this, with similar price points, were equipped with elevators per ADA guidelines. How did this one get a waiver?

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  39. I actually now have to agree with Sabrina that the market is heating up. Lots of places are going under contract including in some cases units that have been on the market for ages, are delisted shortly then relisted at about the same price.

    Normally, I’d laugh and tell the seller good luck but how things are going this very well could go under contract quickly. If it doesn’t a quick price drop to $529k could certainly do it.

    I too am stunned that I actually agreed with HH for once. Elliot, I agree stairs are not an issue and the aggravation they cause occasionally is far outweighed by the added quiet, security and other benefits.

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  40. “I actually now have to agree with Sabrina that the market is heating up. Lots of places are going under contract including in some cases units that have been on the market for ages, are delisted shortly then relisted at about the same price.”

    Benjamon9: I am seeing things re-listed that were last for sale a year or two ago. They are trying again (many times at the same price!) because things have heated up. It’s really the low inventory that is doing it. I’m still waiting to see if sellers are figuring it out and are going to list. Once more inventory comes on, I think we’ll see it calm down a bit.

    Everyone I know is in bidding wars- all over the city and suburbs. First time I’ve EVER seen that in Chicago (that didn’t even happen during the boom here much.)

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  41. “Heck, I’m a 30-something male in relatively good shape, exercise regularly, have no children and I have no interest in a fourth floor walk up.”

    As I’ve said many times before, New York real estate agents will tell you that walk-ups sell for less than buildings with elevators because New Yorkers don’t want to walk up the floors to their apartments either.

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  42. We lived in a 3-story walk-up top unit too. Baby turns into a toddler, and suddenly you’re carrying a 25 lb bundle by the overall straps up three flights of stairs because you don’t have 30 minutes to walk the stairs at toddler-speed. And parking in the garage with a baby/toddler creates a serious parental dilemma: baby or packages first, with knowledge that either way baby will be alone whether in car or in apartment while you unload groceries from car alone for often up to a half-hour of to-fro. And for older walk-ups, there’s the open backporch-deck and unenclosed backstairs issue, requiring improvised netting, babygate, and vigilance. Those who think a 4-story walk-up is “ok” for a family with young kids hasn’t had kids yet themselves.

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  43. ” Those who think a 4-story walk-up is “ok” for a family with young kids hasn’t had kids yet themselves.”

    or are a bunch of limp wristed pansies who need to stop whining. these are the smae ones who thin only one bath for 3 bedrooms is the end of the world will hide and die because tom skilling says snowmageddon part duex is coming.

    yes it sucks and is a pain, but its really not bad all you sissy fat arses. yes i would rather not lug my kid now or back when he was in a baby bucket car seat up and down the stairs. but i can do it and would do it if the situation called for it.

    they real question is would i (you) do it for 549k and on barry and halsted? heck no and who and the heck pay 605k in 2004?

    and really even if it had an elevator who would pay 600k in 2004 for a place that barely has enough room for a sofa and only be able to stick a dining table in the corner.

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  44. I am with groove on this, but also if one is a single parent, the walk up issue is much worse than for a couple raising the kid. We usually either both go shopping with the baby or one of us (or the nanny) is with the baby and then the other(s) go shopping. And before you nag about nannies being expensive. You can get a sitter for 10-12 dollars an hour. I think a 2-3 hour window is all you need for running your errands.

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  45. Friends were looking for an apartment this weekend. They were the second group through a 2-bedroom in Ukrainian Village. Asking $2600. Called later to offer $2400 and were informed that someone was already signing the lease.

    A couple/person with a down payment for this place will see 3k monthly cost and realize they can’t rent anything comparable in the neighborhood. The construction across the street will turn off some buyers, but if the association and building are clean, I won’t be surprised if this sells over 510k. I wouldn’t touch it but I think someone will….stairs or not.

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  46. “A couple/person with a down payment for this place will see 3k monthly cost and realize they can’t rent anything comparable in the neighborhood.”

    So you’re saying a comparable rental (if these owners tried to rent out this unit, for instance) would be over $3000 now? It would be $3500? For a walk up in Lakeview?

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  47. We saw this place over the weekend. I was pooh-poohing the idea of a walkup not being feasible (live in a walkup now, no big whoop). Getting up the stairs from the street was no problem, but coming up from the garage felt like it took forever. The place was unsuitable for other reasons (third “bedroom” was the size of a large closet and had french doors,for one), but the stairs may have given me pause if it met all the other criteria.

    Everyone I know is in bidding wars- all over the city and suburbs. First time I’ve EVER seen that in Chicago (that didn’t even happen during the boom here much.)

    Nearly everyone I know who bought during the late 90s was in at least one bidding war situation; some went through several before finally buying.

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  48. “Nearly everyone I know who bought during the late 90s was in at least one bidding war situation; some went through several before finally buying.”

    Thanks, that is something I have been wondering about. If a home is priced appropriately, it doesn’t seem that surprising in a normally functioning market that more than one person would think it was an appropriately priced place and put in a bid. So “bidding wars” in the sense of there simply being multiple bids (as opposed to really aggressive bidding, whatev that might mean), doesn’t seem to *necessarily* prove a hot market as opposed to a normal one.

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  49. “New York real estate agents will tell you that walk-ups sell for less than buildings with elevators because New Yorkers don’t want to walk up the floors to their apartments either.”

    Who cares about New York? Isn’t this about Chicago? :)

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  50. “Nearly everyone I know who bought during the late 90s was in at least one bidding war situation; some went through several before finally buying.”

    Where? In Chicago? Not that I recall. With 9% interest rates (or whatever it was back then?)

    I don’t know anyone who had been in a bidding war in the Chicago market in the last 30 years (until recently.)

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  51. “So “bidding wars” in the sense of there simply being multiple bids (as opposed to really aggressive bidding, whatev that might mean), doesn’t seem to *necessarily* prove a hot market as opposed to a normal one.”

    If there are bidding wars where the agents are doing what they have done for 15 years in the Bay Area and that is saying “please submit your best and final offer at 5 pm on Friday” then that is NOT normal. Not in the least. That means there is low inventory.

    There might be several offers on a property- which I consider to be different than a bidding war where you have NO IDEA what the others are bidding. With several offers, sometimes you’ll get something like the following from the agent, “we have an offer with 20% down for $410,000. If you can do $420,000 they’ll go with you.”

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  52. “If there are bidding wars where the agents are doing what they have done for 15 years in the Bay Area and that is saying “please submit your best and final offer at 5 pm on Friday” then that is NOT normal. Not in the least. That means there is low inventory.”

    If you’re the selling agent and there are multiple offers and at least one of them is in the range your client is willing to take, wouldn’t you put out a best and final request (which would prob need to include a fairly specific cutoff time)? I suppose there is some small risk of losing your best offer, which is especially costly if it is the highest by a good margin, but wouldn’t you still ask for best and final?

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  53. “I don’t know anyone who had been in a bidding war in the Chicago market in the last 30 years (until recently.)”

    No bidding wars at the peak of the bubble?

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  54. Where? In Chicago? Not that I recall. With 9% interest rates (or whatever it was back then?)
    Yes, in Chicago. And interest rates were 7-ish % towards the end of the 90s.

    http://mortgage-x.com/general/national_monthly_average.asp?y=1997

    Keep in mind that the population of Chicago was about the same then as it is now, and that the green zone was significantly smaller. (Andersonville, Lincoln Square, Logan Square, West Loop and portions of Bucktown/Wicker Park were pre-gentrified.) Also, there were fewer condos and more rental units.

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  55. “I live on the 3rd floor of walk up building like this and I like the exercise. It takes me less than 45 seconds to get up to the third floor of my walkup. Even shorter if I do 2 stairs per-step. I can carry about 5 grocery bags (plastic) per hand so the “bringing up groceries” argument is, again, invalid and rooted in lethargy. If I had kids, I’d want to own the top floor in a building like this, and if there were an elevator I’d still make them walk! We’re already a nation of obese, high fructose corn syrup addicts.”

    Tell me about it. I’ve even seen some idiots taking the elevator at my gym up–it’s supposed to be used for the towel guy to move his cart! My last project it was a 3 floor office park and a lot of people would take the elevator up to the SECOND FLOOR!

    I’ll never forget when I lived in Europe around a decade ago I had a 4th floor walkup (it was nice). Only time I found myself out of breath was taking up as many grocery bags as I could carry (like 10), but soon realized I needed to get in better shape and shouldn’t have to worry about such trivialities. In fact today I’ve added cardio to my workout regimen and never want to be winded again for simple things such as that.

    People that don’t take the stairs are pathetic slobs. And now we’re giving them subsidized healthcare. To hell with Obama.

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  56. As a lawyer who (admittedly rarely) handles real estate transactions, when I’ve seen multiple offers I’ve put everybody in a room one evening to figure things out. Then it becomes like any other negotiation, with decision made on not just price but also on how likely the deal is to actually close.

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  57. Bob, let me guess — no kids? No spouse?
    Try the real world, my bitter friend.

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  58. Is having an elevator a tremendous convenience with kids, groceries and luggage? Of course. We had one for 2.5 years at the place we rented, before buying a place that entails a little stair climbing. I sure wouldn’t mind if our next place had an elevator. But if getting the best possible place (for us) means getting a top floor walk-up, the lack of an elevator won’t be a deal killer (e.g., at the Shakespeare on LPW, it’s the lack of garage parking and a powder room (and to a lesser extent the assessments), not the stairs, that keeps us from considering a third floor unit currently available there). And besides folks who live in ranch homes, don’t all SFHs otherwise entail some stair climbing?

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  59. “No bidding wars at the peak of the bubble?”

    Not by anyone I know. I know it’s been a few years- but remember what was going on. There were THOUSANDS of new units being built everywhere. There were thousands of other properties on the market at any given time (even in older, established neighborhoods like Lincoln Park.) On a “normal” day- 200 new properties were being listed every spring day in the Green Zone (compared to the paltry 10-30 being listed right now.)

    I’m not saying that two people never were interested in the same property when it came on the market- but bidding wars? Hardly.

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  60. “If you’re the selling agent and there are multiple offers and at least one of them is in the range your client is willing to take, wouldn’t you put out a best and final request (which would prob need to include a fairly specific cutoff time)?”

    It is only in the last 2 to 3 months that there have been 10 to 20 offers on a single property. If there are 2 offers why would you do the cut off? You wouldn’t. You would just go to both buyers and say, “this is what we have in now. Either beat it or we’re going with the other buyer.”

    In San Francisco- there would routinely be 30 to 40 offers on a house when it was set up as a “best and final offer” type of situation. You’re really bidding against nothing. It’s completely in favor of the seller. I refused to do it when I lived in the Bay Area and I would refuse to do it in Chicago. What’s next? Waiving inspections in order to be the winning “bid”? (which is also what happens in the Bay Area.)

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  61. “As a lawyer who (admittedly rarely) handles real estate transactions, when I’ve seen multiple offers I’ve put everybody in a room one evening to figure things out.”

    You’re not doing that in this kind of market. The best and final offer almost always gets you at least one offer way over ask.

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  62. Exactly Sabrina, and too many in the business have not figured that out.
    It was frustrating at times representing the seller (and again, this is a very small amount of my practice — most of it is for condo associations) and having the agent not engineer the best deal for the seller.
    I would gently suggest a different approach.
    Negotiation has the same general rules whether you are negotiating with two contractors to lower the price on a facade repair or whether you have two buyers negotiating to buy a condo.

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  63. Sabrina, when you have two buyers, way over ask may not be the best deal. Why limit yourself?
    You have two buyers. Both bids come in the same day at or near list.
    I suggest a meeting. I bring in the rep for the buyers and put them in the room.
    I put my seller in another.
    Before the buyers come in, we tell the buyers that we need information as to financing, etc. We need to know about any contingencies.
    Then we bring the buyers into the room one at time and see what we can do. It can take a couple of rounds but the deal gets done.
    Once you have the bid, it is important to be careful not to blow it by rejecting or making an express counter-offer.
    Instead, it is “my clients are considering this. They haven’t made a decision. What can you do?”

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  64. “It is only in the last 2 to 3 months that there have been 10 to 20 offers on a single property. If there are 2 offers why would you do the cut off? You wouldn’t. You would just go to both buyers and say, “this is what we have in now. Either beat it or we’re going with the other buyer.””

    First, I didn’t realize multiple offers==10 to 20 offers.

    Second, it just seems like a different way of negotiating/auctioning. In the scenario you describe, if you’re going to take one of the offers, how is it that different from asking for best and final?

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  65. “And besides folks who live in ranch homes, don’t all SFHs otherwise entail some stair climbing?”

    The lugging your groceries, stroller, whatev, up stairs, has some (minor) legitimacy as an issue. That’s much much less of issue in SFH.

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  66. “And besides folks who live in ranch homes, don’t all SFHs otherwise entail some stair climbing?”

    yes but generally you bring your groceries in to the first floor kitchen (2nd floor kitchens are rare, i’ve only seen one here on CC) and maybe your toiletries to the 2nd floor. Your Costco bulk items probably go in the basement storage or stay in the garage. Point being you don’t lug all your packages, kids and strollers up 3-4 flights of stairs in a SFH all at once anyway.

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  67. “Tell me about it. I’ve even seen some idiots taking the elevator at my gym up–it’s supposed to be used for the towel guy to move his cart! My last project it was a 3 floor office park and a lot of people would take the elevator up to the SECOND FLOOR!”

    A lot of people in my office park take the elevator to the 2nd floor. Usually it’s someone who is obviously obese and probably has knee issues. Other times its someone who cannot figure out where the stairwell is — they are across the lobby away from the elevators. I try not to begrudge them their laziness because for all I know they have serious knee issues or are in a hurry and it is faster to take the elevator even for one flight of stairs and it only delays me a few seconds.

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  68. “2nd floor kitchens are rare, i’ve only seen one here on CC”

    Including the one today?

    “Point being you don’t lug all your packages, kids and strollers up 3-4 flights of stairs in a SFH all at once anyway.”

    Also if your kid is asleep or not yet capable of unbuckling, you can leave him/her in garage if asleep, while you’re unloading.

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  69. Regarding the stairs: In this particular unit (and in many newer construction condos); it’s not so much the number of stairs as it is the configuration of the stairs. Like I said, I live in a walk-up now. But it’s a vintage building, and it’s a six-flat, so it has a nice wide stairwell, with windows and a skylight, a old wood banister/railings, and landings between floors. This place, the front stairwell was just one long, steep, narrow flight of stairs with two tiny “landings” that were only big enough for a door to another unit. If you dropped something at the top of the stairs, it would tumble all the way to the bottom, unimpeded. The back stairwell was metal and concrete. So, walking up and down the stairs was loud and echo-y.

    It just depresses me to think that every time I entered or exited my home it would be an unpleasant experience.

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  70. “Also if your kid is asleep or not yet capable of unbuckling, you can leave him/her in garage if asleep, while you’re unloading.”

    Your neighbor, Snoopy-Suzy, will call DCFS on you when she sees you come out of the garage w/o the kid.

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  71. “Regarding the stairs: In this particular unit (and in many newer construction condos); it’s not so much the number of stairs as it is the configuration of the stairs. ”

    great point

    i rented a big apartment complex once, stairwells wide and huge landings which had a small bench on each floor landing.

    i also in rented a narrow steep walk up and i swear getting the furniture to the 3rd floor was the worst moving experience ever!!! I had to disassemble the railings to do it

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  72. “Including the one today?”
    Didn’t see todays when i posted but there was another that was a two flat converted to SHF and for some reason they kept the kitchen on 2nd floor.

    “Regarding the stairs: In this particular unit (and in many newer construction condos); it’s not so much the number of stairs as it is the configuration of the stairs. ”
    Great point +1 In some buildings there is actually a space you can leave your stroller so you don’t have to cart it up and down.

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  73. I work in a complex that has escalators and not only do most people take them instead of nearby stairs to go up one floor, many just stand on the escalator rather than climbing it. It’s a pet peeve of mine because the escalators are too narrow to pass anyone, so on the rare occasion when I need to take the escalator rather than the stairs, I get stuck behind them.

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  74. “many just stand on the escalator rather than climbing it. It’s a pet peeve of mine because the escalators are too narrow to pass anyone, so on the rare occasion when I need to take the escalator rather than the stairs”

    What *possible* reason is there that you “need” to take the escalator?

    People are perfectly entitled to stand on escalators.

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  75. “People are perfectly entitled to stand on escalators.”

    No they are not! Its not a frickin carnival ride, they are stairs!

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  76. “No they are not! Its not a frickin carnival ride, they are stairs!”

    Then take the non-moving stairs. Or insist that your building turn them off.

    Elevators aren’t carnival rides either–so they shouldn’t allow selection of less than a 3 floor difference, right?

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  77. At my office’s building, i am forced to take the escalators to the 2nd floor to get to the elevator bank, thankfully they are two (normal) people wide so most people are courteous enough to stand to the right side and have a passing lane on the left.

    But seriously, you have an office job where you sit on your ass all day, how lazy are you people that you can’t get some 15 extra steps of exercise in before work?

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  78. “how lazy are you people that you can’t get some 15 extra steps of exercise in before work”

    if i am hung over and dragging into work i will stand on an escalator and could give a flying F if i piss off anyone behind me.

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