2233 n bissell

Vintage 3-Bedroom In Lincoln Park Sells For $99K Under The 2004 Price: 2233 N. Bissell

Mar 14 • Lincoln Park • 167 Views • 14 Comments

We last chattered about this 3-bedroom vintage unit at 2233 N. Bissell in Lincoln Park in November 2012.

See our prior chatter here.

It was listed at $425,000 but most of you thought it would sell closer to $400,000 because of the smaller room sizes.

The unit recently closed for $415,000.

If you recall, it was NOT on the El side of the street.

Built in 1891, it had many of its original features including original moldings, a wood burning fireplace with the original oak mantle, built-in hutches and pocket doors.

There was also a custom wall of bookcases.

The kitchen had white cabinets with wood counter tops and it looks like there were white appliances.

It had a washer/dryer in the unit and garage parking but no central air- there were window units only.

This unit is on the second floor of a 3-unit building.

It closed for $99,000 under the 2004 price.

Did someone get a deal?

Art Collazo at Jameson Sotheby’s had the listing. You can still see the pictures here.

Unit #2: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, no square footage listed

  • Sold in November 2004 for $514,000
  • Originally listed in June 2012 for $475,000
  • Reduced several times
  • Was listed in November 2012 at $425,000 (garage parking included)
  • Sold in March 2013 for $415,000
  • Assessments of $250 a month
  • Taxes of $4335
  • No central air
  • Washer/dryer in the unit
  • Bedroom #1: 14×19
  • Bedroom #2: 12×9
  • Bedroom #3: 10×10
  • Den: 14×12

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14 Responses to Vintage 3-Bedroom In Lincoln Park Sells For $99K Under The 2004 Price: 2233 N. Bissell

  1. looking to buy says:

    Sounds about right and I bet having 3br helped even though they are all small considering the square footage is probablay the same as all the 2/2′s in the area.

  2. T.S. says:

    Listing says 1,150 sq. ft. 3 bedrooms in that small of a space must be a bit cramped. However, it’s lovely and I like the location. The only thing is I would NEVER buy a 2nd floor condo, especially in a vintage building. We are on the 3rd floor of a vintage building and our 2nd floor neighbors came up the other day to let us know they were thinking about moving because of the noise. Oy

  3. brad says:

    Solving the noise is cheaper than moving. You can add a layer of drywall and a special layer of glue-like material to 800 sq feet for about $10,000. It’s called green goo or something close to that.

    Should solve 95% of the noise transmission issues.

  4. Phil says:

    I think you have to float the entire ceiling, in addition to applying sound proofing materials, to effectively reduce noise? Seems like more than a 10k job.

  5. c says:

    3rd bedroom saved this place. no central a/c would be a deal breaker. not sure how you get it all into 1150sq ft though.

  6. anon (tfo) says:

    “green goo or something ”

    http://www.greengluecompany.com/

    “800 sq feet for about $10,000″

    That’s a lot for labor, if you’re just talking about 800 SF of ceiling area. The green glue should be under $1000, ~$350 for the sheetrock, couple hundred for tape and compound–If you’re paying $10/sf for sheetrock install in Chicago, even with greenglue, you’re paying *eay* too much.

  7. Recent Lawgrad says:

    Completely unrelated, but this place recently went on the market which is very close to where I live. http://www.redfin.com/IL/Chicago/1830-N-Bissell-St-60614/home/13350676

    Thoughts on tear down? There’s already been one complete tear down within a year or so about 7 houses north of this one.

  8. Phil says:

    Does the extra layer of drywall and green goo work “decent” for ceilings?

    Read you had to rip out the ceiling and suspend a new one, even that doesn’t completely solve noise issues.

    http://diydata.com/general_building/floor_sound/sound_proofing.php

  9. brad says:

    My research into the noise issue in a vintage building (I live in one) shows that 95% of the impact noise will be solved with the green glue. You can do a suspended ceiling, but the green stuff is a new technology and probably easier to install.

    I never went forward with it though because we have our bedroom in the lower level so we sleep like babies and upstairs we just got used to it during the day/evening. The $10k quote included removing my crown molding and replacing it after the new layer of drywall was added. Still a little bit high I would agree :-)

  10. anon (tfo) says:

    “[1830 Bissell] Thoughts on tear down?”

    1. There’s a reason they’ve been trying to dump it for *6* years, and let it go into f/c.
    2. It’s barely over a half lot (24×70).
    3. You really want to have a ~$750k, small-ish, house backing up to the brown line basically on the curve?

    Or were you suggesting tearing it down for a parking lot? That seems kinda reasonable–think you could make 7 spots work?

  11. T.S. says:

    Don’t know anything about the goo but we have beautiful decorative dining room modling as well as very thick moldings throughout the rest of our place. I don’t think they neighbors would want to risk messing that up. Our building is 100 years old, and as my mom says “they don’t make them like this anymore!”

  12. johnnyU says:

    Any of these products are only as good as the details.

    Any openings are going to greatly impact the sound transmission characteristics of a system

  13. Groove77 says:

    “We are on the 3rd floor of a vintage building and our 2nd floor neighbors came up the other day to let us know they were thinking about moving because of the noise”

    I didnt know you were an oboe player in HS. way to keep the dream alive.

  14. Nonchatterer says:

    “We are on the 3rd floor of a vintage building and our 2nd floor neighbors came up the other day to let us know they were thinking about moving because of the noise”

    White noise machines work like a charm. Offer to go halfsies with them on the best one you can buy. Or are you married to Yngwie Malmsteen?

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