1870s Farmhouse Turned Contemporary SFH Still on the Market: 2734 N. Marshfield in Lincoln Park

This 2-bedroom farmhouse at 2734 N. Marshfield in Lincoln Park came on the market in September 2013.

See our prior chatter here.

If you recall, the farmhouse was built in 1870 but has been transformed into a contemporary loft-like space inside with a floating staircase.

It has floor to ceiling windows in the back of the house which look out onto the 25×127 lot.

The master bedroom is on the second level with the second bedroom on the first level.

The kitchen has stainless steel appliances and butcher block counter tops. (Is that a small size refrigerator tucked next to the stove?)

It has all the other features buyers look for including central air and a 2-car garage.

It came on the market just after the hot spring/summer selling season and after mortgage rates rose.

Listed last year for $599,000 it still remains priced at $599,000.

What will it take to sell this house in 2014′s spring market?

Emily Sachs Wong at Koenig & Strey Real Living still has the listing. See the pictures here.

2734 N. Marshfield: 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, no square footage listed, 2 car garage
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  • Sold in January 1988 for $91,000
  • Was listed in September 2013 for $599,000
  • Still listed for $599,000
  • Taxes of $7216
  • Central Air
  • Bedroom #1: 19×13 (second floor)
  • Bedroom #2: 6×15 (main floor)
  • Family room: 10×12 (main floor)

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2 Responses to “1870s Farmhouse Turned Contemporary SFH Still on the Market: 2734 N. Marshfield in Lincoln Park”

  1. What will it take? About 500 sq feet to miraculously append itself to this property.

  2. “What will it take? About 500 sq feet to miraculously append itself to this property.”

    I wouldn’t call $100k (max–it’s be really nice then) of construction a “miracle”. And then, with a $100k addition, the place would prob sell easily in the high-700s.

    $600k is just about a teardown price–it’s just slightly locationally challenged for that.

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