Who Will Save The DuPont-Whitehouse Mansion? 3558 S. Artesian in McKinley Park

This 3-bedroom Italianate mansion at 3558 S. Artesian in McKinley Park has been on the market since June 2010.

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In that time it has been reduced $150,900 to $199,000.

Built in 1875, it was the mansion for the Chicago based agent of DuPont gunpowder.

The house apparently has been moved a block and a half from its original location and is now located on a 50×125 lot with a 2 car garage.

The seller (who is also the listing agent) purchased the house in 2002 with the intention of restoring it. Some work has been done but the recession got in the way.

It has dual parlors and 3 fireplaces.

All 3 bedrooms are on the second floor.

You can learn more about the history of the house (and why everyone moves on May 1st)- in this May 2011 WTTW segment. (The history of the house is the second segment in the show.)

Curbed Chicago also did a nice post on the house in March 2011 with a lot of pictures and a discussion with the seller about what has already been done to the house. See that here.

Do you have the vision to save this house?

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Oscar Campos at Su Familia Real Estate has the listing. See more pictures here.

3558 S. Artesian: 3 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 4332 square feet, 2 car garage

  • Sold in August 1998 for $140,000
  • Sold in April 2002 for $160,000
  • Originally listed in June 2010 for $349,900
  • Reduced many times
  • Currently listed at $199,000
  • Taxes of $1790
  • No heat or central air
  • 50×125 lot
  • 3 fireplaces
  • Skylights

70 Responses to “Who Will Save The DuPont-Whitehouse Mansion? 3558 S. Artesian in McKinley Park”

  1. Gorge home and nice lot! Close to the 35th & Archer Orange Line stop too.

    Two questions:
    – What’s the area like?
    – How much would it cost to fix?

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  2. “How much would it cost to fix?”

    Enought that it prolly would be the most expensive house within a mile+.

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  3. this place looks like it belongs on Broadway Ave in Gary Indiana… it would take a shitload of money to redo this disaster

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  4. Bob! Where’s Bob when there’s a great deal in bridgeport/Mckinley park!

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  5. Har har. The listing agent who purchased this mega-fixer-upper was clearly counting on ever-inflating prices and the power of the HELOC to help him restore this faded beauty.

    He was thinking, oooooooohhhhh, I am going to buy this place and it will double in price and I will pull $200K out of it to do some work and it will then be worth $600K and then it will double in price again because housing is going to the moon, and I will get another $600K home equity loan to do more work, and it will be worth $1.2M, and then housing prices will go up more and it will be worth, oh, $2.4M in another 2 years, so I can borrow another $800K to finish up the reno and maybe buy some great antiques,and then I can sell it for $3M…………

    Didn’t quite work that way, did it?

    Oh, well, at least he got the gut done and a skylight installed. Someone else who has real money can do the rest, if s/he wants to live on 38th St.

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  6. Oh yeah, it would take about $2.4M to restore this place, never mind the furniture and drapes.

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  7. What a mess. You would have to pay me a sh*tload to get involved with this.

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  8. This is an incredible home that has great potential. Too bad the Commission on Chicago Landmarks will probably an insurmountable barrier to having this thing finished in the next decade.

    Laura, why all the hate on the current owner? He put $100k into it thus far and it sounds like he did a lot of work himself. So he had huge aspirations and was probably over his head, so what? If we never had people like that in this world we would never have airplanes or skyscrapers or computers.

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  9. ‘Didn’t quite work that way, did it?’

    Ever think that maybe he did it for the love of an old house? Believe it or not, not everyone buys a house to flip. If it wasn’t for people like this in the 70’s, most of the classic old homes/rows in LP and OT would have been leveled by developers and replaced with fugly but more profitable 4+1s. The Victorian mansion on the NE corner of Belden and Cleveland was purchased by neighbors chipping in cash when a developer wanted to do just that (well before my time and before the area became landmarked).

    When I moved into LP *no one* ever expected to turn a profit on renovating their Victorian; it was something you just had to do, as the other options of living in a bland high rise or the burbs was/is unthinkable for some. Profit isn’t always a factor when buying (an idea totally foreign today), it can be purely emotional… ask anyone who owns and maintains a 140 year old home.

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  10. I understand doing it for the love of an old house. When young, I wanted more than anything to buy a fine old home in decrepit condition in St. Louis’ Lafayette Park area and restore it to its period. My cousin bought and finished the restoration of the house there known as the Brian House, as the man who sold it to my cousin was the restoration architect for St. Louis’ Old Courthouse. Brian had done the “dirty” work of replacing all the mechanical elements and reinforcing the walls and otherwise making the house habitable and safe, and my cousin finished restoring the place… and got a huge lesson in the cost of renovating a place like this, as well as the ongoing carrying costs. My cousin’s place was only 9 rooms (with 12′ ceilings) and 3 stories, but a female friend of mine bought a somewhat larger place on the same street and within two years was looking to unload because she was quickly buried in the costs and problems. Lafayette Park is an area comparable to the Chicago nabe the featured house is located in- a nabe whose glory passed about 90 years ago and has become very impoverished and decrepit, AND unsafe, since. Since my cousin’s time in the place in the 70s, the area has held steady- has a few trendy eateries and many beautifully restored homes, but has not improved. Frankly, the only real improvement since that time was the demolition of the horrible high rise housing projects 4 blocks away and their replacement with attractive townhouse-type projects. The neighborhood just cannot attract the investment and upper-middle or better incomes it needs for those houses to be restored as homes, and the beautiful Eads (former home of famous bridge engineer) was allowed to literally collapse a few years ago.

    So I’m chuckling because I really would think that anyone over the age of 25 could take one look at something like this and know right away that it is about 50 fathoms over his head. Just redoing the exterior is scary. Never mind mold problems, the roof, the walls, decrepit structural elements (you know, the parts that support the building and keep it from falling down)the wiring, the plumbing, and then the cosmetic work involved in restoring the walls, the intricate crown moldings and other decorative details, the appropriate fixtures and fittings- check out the costs of large crystal chandeliers correct for the period, or even door hardware. Then there is the kitchen, and baths, and maybe you have to shore up the sagging floors or rebuild them completely, and then there’s the cost of carrying the place once you have it done.

    I tend to doubt that this seller ever did have anything like what it would take to even carry this place even if he got it fully restored as a tax-free gift. Many people have just no idea what it really costs just to pay the expenses on something like this, but even if I got it as a free and clear gift, I couldn’t imagine living in it with an income of less than $300K a year. How many real estate agents made that much even at the top of the Great Rampage?

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  11. Chibuilder on September 30th, 2011 at 11:07 am
    “Laura, why all the hate on the current owner? So he had huge aspirations and was probably over his head, so what? If we never had people like that in this world we would never have airplanes or skyscrapers or computers.”

    Haha. Nice try Chibuilder. Real estate speculators are not Steve Jobs or the Wright brothers.

    The current owner took on a stupidly expensive project in a market where prices were never sustainable. Solyndra anyone?

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  12. It’s sad to see such an elegant old home in such disrepair. I don’t see how fixing this up would be financially smart in any way and the neighborhood is iffy. Someone would have to really love this house, not care about the surrounding area, and be able to afford to fix it. The market is sadly limited. I hope it doesn’t get torn down.

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  13. “Haha. Nice try Chibuilder. Real estate speculators are not Steve Jobs or the Wright brothers.”

    Haha, I never said he was.

    “The current owner took on a stupidly expensive project in a market where prices were never sustainable. Solyndra anyone?”

    Is that because you know him personally? Or are you making a broad statement based on your generalized opinion?

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  14. This is kind of a heartbreaking story. Did you see the picture of him posing with the cypress bracket? It makes me sad. This guy had a dream, tried to make it happen and failed. When did we get so mean? Why do we have to judge him for that?

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  15. “If we never had people like that in this world we would never have airplanes or skyscrapers or computers”

    There’s a huge difference between sacrificing to advance humanity and sacrificing to restore a piece of shit house in a piece of shit neighborhood. Failing at the latter is nothing to be proud of, although I wouldn’t hate on the dude.

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  16. “There’s a huge difference between sacrificing to advance humanity and sacrificing to restore a piece of shit house in a piece of shit neighborhood. Failing at the latter is nothing to be proud of, although I wouldn’t hate on the dude.”

    Understood. Doing something because you love doing it, financial consequences notwithstanding can yield incredible results. I think that’s what this guy was after… I could be wrong.

    – Howard Hughes built the H4 Hurcules (Spruce Goose) for the love of Aviation, it was a technical marvel but a financial flop.
    – Steve Wozniak built Apple for the love of it, he was never driven by money. Read any interview with him on the subject.
    – There are dozens of skyscraper developers that built just to build and went into financial ruin… Chicago Spire anyone?

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  17. Why are we heartbroken over this? He put $260k into it ($160k purchase plus $100 reno) and listed it for $350, hoping to make a ~$90k profit.

    Howard Hughes, Steve Wozniak, Santiago Calatrava?????????? Come onnnnnnnnnnn. Those are visionaries and inventors. This is just a guy fixing up a house. So he can either 1) live in a mansion or 2) sell at a profit. Unfortunately it didn’t work out, but it is in no way heartbreaking.

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  18. “Howard Hughes, Steve Wozniak, Santiago Calatrava?????????? Come onnnnnnnnnnn.”

    Not comparing the person, just making a point. Would you rather I use examples of people you’ve never heard of?

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  19. I think the best bet now is too find a young adventurous person that will buy it for nothing (sub $60K) and do a DIY interior outfitting to make it habitable.

    There is no way this place with this location is ever going to get a period restoration.

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  20. Project costs probably overwhelmed owner-broker’s personal resources. Final restoration costs would total way higher than neighborhood’s otherwise “highest-priced house” comp. Maybe the McKinley Park Historical Society (making that up) can team up neighborhood services providers and/or non-profits to obtain grants for its renovation and operation. Pity to demolish house shell, but this location isn’t fertile ground for “This Old House” gentrification by a deep-pocketed homeowner.

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  21. McKinley Park is hard to get a fix on; I like it but I doubt many here would. Working class and increasingly Mexican. Pretty clean and well kept up and less trash and litter on the streets than in neighborhoods like Old Irving but you will see neglected dumps next to nice buildings. Many store windows show signs of gang grafitti. Has one of the city’s best restaurants, Huck Finn at Archer and Damen.

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  22. I agree with Sidelined Buyer. Too many beautiful old buildings have been torn down in Chicago in general. I commend the seller for attempting a period restoration and putting so much heart into it.

    I’m depressed now…

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  23. Oldman, that’s interesting and I think I’ll check McKinley Park out. I recently walked from Pilsen to Cicero and I really liked Little Village just north of here. McKinley Park sounds similar. Little Village was working class and working-poor but not welfare-poor. Very Mexican. A few hipsters. I even saw a few yuppie joggers on Cermak. Good access to the el. Active commercial strips including major banks and plenty of supermarkets. I would live in Little Village. Definitely over some Northside neighborhoods.

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  24. . “Little Village was working class and working-poor but not welfare-poor.”

    There used to be lots of money in that neighborhood when it was full of Bohemians, they still had their communion money. My father grew up over there by Shedd Park, back in the 1920s and 30s. There were Irish around there too and then Jews to the north, then north of the Jews lots of Irish.

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  25. That area around Shedd Park has some beautiful old buildings too, but when you’re walking west on Cermak, you go under this bridge around Central Park Avenue and then you are literally quite suddenly on the wrong side of the tracks. There was a cluster of 8 – 12 year old boys smoking reefer on the corner. I almost chided them and then thought better of it and kept my mouth shut. Lots of men hanging out on porches smoking blunts. Lots of derelict old lounges. Someone kept catcalling me “baby mama! baby mama!” Creepy. It continued on like that until I reached Cicero and things got much more normal again. I would live in Cicero too.

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  26. “I commend the seller for attempting a period restoration and putting so much heart into it.”

    As a vintage lover, hear, hear. Financial realities may prevent this house from being saved but it’s too bad. This seller obviously cared and appreciated what makes homes like this unique. IMO, the fact that things did not work out makes him another casualty of the market, not an object of scorn.

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  27. This house is beautiful and would be such a great project. I wonder what the cost would be to move it (actually I already have an idea, but just wanted to see what other people perceive is the cost to move a house like this 1 mile, 10 miles).

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  28. Some dreams are cockamanie and the rehab of this. Place in this location qualifies as such. The term for a person with a cockamanie idea and little means or drive to follow through is called a ‘goof’.

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  29. “Haha. Nice try Chibuilder. Real estate speculators are not Steve Jobs or the Wright brothers.”

    best comment of the week winner!

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  30. This looks like a very realistic option for my family and me. I’ll have to head to the open house to measure the rooms for our furniture.

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  31. One important note: The DuPont house is not in McKinley Park! It is west of Western, so it is actually in Brighton Park. This sounds like all of those properties listed as being in “West Wicker Park.”

    I live in McKinley Park and feel that this neighborhood wouldn’t appeal to most of the “Green Zoners” here on CribChatter, due to the diversity of people here. We have a mix of Hispanic, white and Chinese (growing rapidly), as well as a lot of folks who may not be rich, but who work hard for a living and take pride in their homes. Not really the CribChatter type.

    My wife and I (both well-compensated professionals) have found McKinley Park to be great for our purposes. We have settled here and plan to raise our child (literally born yesterday) here with no qualms for safety or quality of life versus any other Chicago neighborhood. The 69-acre park is fantastic, and transportation is great, too. We are east of the park, where a preponderance of single family homes gives the area a spread-out, almost suburban feel. I have enjoyed how far our housing dollar has stretched here, both from the standpoint of buying a bomb-proof brick building, as well as the reduced costs for renovation due to a huge nearby population of contractors and no real need for any building permits. (YMMV here; we’ve done A LOT without getting the City involved, including many things you could never do without a permit on the north side or West Town. However, we have a SFH, and I wouldn’t try much of what we did in a rental income property.)

    My only complaint would be a need for more diverse retail in the neighborhood: You can certainly get everything you need, but, for example, I find myself trekking over to Bridgeport for speciality coffee beans and Mediterranean food. My wife and I play “Spot the Hipster” as more young people/students/artists move here, driven out of Pilsen and Bridgeport by higher rents and a lack of cool spaces.

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  32. You could compare this old house to a romantic partner who’s been around the block a few times and is a little bruised and banged up from the dirt of life but still has heart and will love you back. As opposed to a fickle young thing – (new construction) – which has a pretty facade, but behind that, is merely an empty shell with no gravitas.

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  33. Juiceman – Best wishes for you and the new family; hope all goes well. It’s good to see you expressing the optimism of the “urban pioneers” of a couple decades ago.

    But now I’ll bring it up because if I don’t, someone else will: how will you feel once the kid reaches school age? Have you + wife researched the local education situation? If it’s not to your liking NOW, will you make a commitment to join the LSC or other civic organization to press for improvement so that by the time YOUR baby needs public schooling, you won’t say “Well, it’s okay for the neighbors but not for us” and trek to the suburbs or a “better CPS district?

    “Pioneers” like you helped to bring about the improvement of long-neglected public schools in other nabes. I hope your family can rise to the challenge now.

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  34. “This house is beautiful and would be such a great project. I wonder what the cost would be to move it (actually I already have an idea, but just wanted to see what other people perceive is the cost to move a house like this 1 mile, 10 miles).”

    They’ve already moved it once (and if you had read/watched any of the links in the post about the history of the house you would know that.) The bricks were damaged in that move- which also now has to be repaired.

    McKinley Park is an average neighborhood. I used to work there. It was a Polish immigrant neighborhood for decades and started switching to Mexican (with some Chinese spillover from Chinatown) about 20 years ago. I knew a Polish American woman who was incensed in about 1993 that her Catholic church was going to start services in spanish.

    There are some very good authentic mexican restaurants in the neighborhood as a result. Are the old Ukranian/Polish restaurants on Western still there? I used to eat lunch at those all the time (with many of the local police.) Good, cheap food.

    Good access to transportation from here (Stevenson and Orange Line) and it was always quick to get downtown. We used to eat out a lot in Chinatown too.

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  35. “Some dreams are cockamanie and the rehab of this. Place in this location qualifies as such.”

    Wow. What is wrong with you people?

    I knew someone who bought a run down greystone just off Wicker Park in 1993 for cheap. People thought he was crazy. It took FOREVER and cost a fortune for him to rehab it. The neighborhood sucked. He heard gunshots nightly.

    Maybe everyone called him crazy too. But he loved the house. He got lucky that the neighborhood changed.

    This seller bought the DuPont house in 2002. That was before the boom got really out of hand. Since it is basically 10 years later- I doubt he bought it with a quick flip in mind. He sounds like my friend who bought it simply because he loved the house and wanted to restore it.

    10 years later is NOT a professional flipper.

    This house is fabulous. But it’s going to take someone with $200k in cash to come in and finally finish it.

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  36. danny (lower case D) on October 1st, 2011 at 10:11 am

    Milkster: “You could compare this old house to a romantic partner who’s been around the block a few times and is a little bruised and banged up from the dirt of life but still has heart and will love you back.”

    To me it looks like a smelly meth-head who got prettied up with some botox and dentures.

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  37. “Loving Chicago is like loving a woman with a broken nose. You may love lovelier lovelies, but never a lovely so real.”

    Nelson Algren, “City on the Make”

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  38. “This house is fabulous. But it’s going to take someone with $200k in cash to come in and finally finish it.”

    Well times are a’great. Let me just go walk over to my money tree..I heard everyone in McK park has one or two of ‘em.

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  39. “Maybe everyone called him crazy too. But he loved the house. He got lucky that the neighborhood changed. ”

    I don’t see whitbread hipsters on bikes with tattoos and piercings, without kids so with disposable income, moving to McKP any time soon. It’s too far off the beaten path for suburban types and transplants wanting an urban experience.

    Droping at least 200k on this to bring it to life is a fool’s errand.

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  40. danny (lower case D) on October 1st, 2011 at 2:14 pm

    Nelson Algren (the prototypical hipster) gave Simon De Beauvoir her first orgasm in his apartment on Wabansia (now occupied by the Kennedy Expressway).

    http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2009/08/27/when-nelson-algren-met-simone-de-beauvoir-

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  41. Chitowngal, we’ve actually thought this through. McKinley Park has a very good charter school (public/free) that we’re going to aim to have our son attend. Even the “regular” grammar school was built in 2001 (or thereabouts), so it’s a newer, nicer facility. (I hear mixed reports on the quality of teaching, but my opinion about grammar school is that much of what the children are learning is to shut up, sit still, and stand in line without complaining. Of course, there’s more to it than that, but we’re committed to being very active in our child’s education. Another advantage I see of public school is social education: having our kid be around “real” people and not just a bunch of spoiled rich kids and their douchey parents.)
    If for some reason a neighborhood public school isn’t viable, there are a couple highly regarded private grammar schools within a couple blocks … although I would be very cautious about going toward a Catholic option, as the Catholic Church has pretty much institutionalized pederasty, and my wife and I in general don’t go for a “magic man in the sky” belief system. But hey, I figure this would/could be cast for the boy as a comparative religion experience.
    We are indeed making a commitment to the neighborhood and plan to be active in groups related to improving the neighborhood and its educational institutions. I’m currently networking with other McKinley Park professionals to see about kick-starting the neighborhood association.

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  42. “as the Catholic Church has pretty much institutionalized pederasty”

    When a priest touches a kid it makes headlines. When a non-priest touches a kid you never hear about it.

    You aren’t going to fit in too well with such an anti-religious stance in these neighborhoods is my suspicion. Bridgeport & McKP are filled with Mexican-Americans, Italian-Americans and Irish-Americans. Couldn’t pick a more Catholic lot if you tried.

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  43. Okay maybe McKP is more mexicans than anything but still..

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  44. “Bridgeport & McKP are filled with Mexican-Americans, Italian-Americans and Irish-Americans. Couldn’t pick a more Catholic lot if you tried.”

    That’s OK, he’s gonna network with other professionals.

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  45. “Dropping at least 200k on this to bring it to life is a fool’s errand.”

    Not if you love the house and want to live in it Bob. People SO forget how awful Wicker Park/Bucktown was just 20 years ago. And there were no hipsters living in places like Andersonville either.

    Drive down to Pullman and see who’s living there. Lots of architects and people who just love architecture. And you can’t get more out of the way than Pullman.

    Many of you have very narrow views of Chicago’s city neighborhoods. I’m just saying. Some people WILL be urban pioneers. This house might work out well for them (or someone like Juiceman might be interested in buying it once the renovation was complete.)

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  46. Since the Catholic schools here instituted the “Virtus” training and protocols, they have become just about the safest place for kids there is. Have you ever looked at the horrendous rates of sexual abuse in the public schools?

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  47. @ Austin, I don’t know about US, but in most of European countries child abuse was endemic in Catholic institutions. I would be surprised if it is completely different here.

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  48. Architects still living in Pullman? Maybe in 70s and 80s when I knew three, but not as likely now that Pullman’s demeanor seems more like East Roseland than trending towards yuppie. A friend, a young single male black professional, considered buying a run-down Pullman rowhouse in the mid-90s but didn’t because neighborhood conditions seemed so unstable even then.

    Regarding gentrification of Brighton Park/McKinley Park: there are city workers residing there with 6-figure household incomes, but not a typical yuppie-gentrifier demographic. Bridgeport has some expensive housing and Alderman Burke’s palace at the Chicago River, but Bridgeport’s neighborhood lifestyle conditions are hardly equivalent to North Shore or Green Zone living.

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  49. Bob 2 (Not Bob) on October 3rd, 2011 at 8:13 am

    “who work hard for a living and take pride in their homes. Not really the CribChatter type.”

    Slightly taken out of context, but come on, that’s a bit arrogant don’t you think?

    “People SO forget how awful Wicker Park/Bucktown was just 20 years ago.”

    That area always had potential due to its history and more importantly location. Ain’t gonna happen to McKinley the next 20 years.

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  50. “Since the Catholic schools here instituted the “Virtus” training and protocols, they have become just about the safest place for kids there is.”

    I suppose you believe in everything the church says, yes?

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  51. “there were no hipsters living in places like Andersonville”

    Maybe not in places “like” A’ville, but *in* A’ville, yah shoor, you betcha there were.

    Not 21st c. hipsters, of course.

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  52. went to both catholic and public schools. in the years since both a former principal and teacher have been caught romancing boys. one offender was from the catholic school and one was from the public.

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  53. Re: Catholic pederasty, the church has pretty much sheltered pederast priests non-stop until recently. And they still continue to shelter child abusers, using “church law” to discipline (slaps on the hand), rather than reporting the child abusers to the authorities. I have no reason to trust the Catholic church. As for my neighbors, they can believe in whatever magic man in the sky they wish.
    Re: CribChatter “Green Zoners,” yes, you guys have blinders on. Not everyone aspires to North Side palaces so large you never have to see your neighbors or deal with “undesirables” from the neighborhood. I find so much of the conversations here very classist, bordering on racist.
    Re: urban pioneering. Key-rist, I had no idea we were urban pioneers. I just thought I was moving into a nice, safe, convenient South Side neighborhood where my housing dollar goes a LONG way. Come on down and walk around; McKinley ain’t Englewood or Back of the Yards.

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  54. OK, let’s call it: “Catholic Church tolerating child abuse for many decades, not reporting pedophile priests to the authorities, acting as an accomplice by sheltering child abusers, instituting policies that hide the abuse from the public and the authorities, and promoting officials who clearly have no interest in addressing these issues. (The current pope, who was supposedly in charge of pedophile priests for years, but let many many cases languish on his desk with no action.)
    Sorry, but child abuse and Catholocism are pretty much synonymous in my book. I hope that one day all Catholic priest abusers and those who acted as their accomplices are called to task for their crimes.

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  55. Bob 2 (Not Bob) on October 3rd, 2011 at 10:47 am

    ““Green Zoners,” yes, you guys have blinders on. ”
    “deal with “undesirables” from the neighborhood”
    “this neighborhood wouldn’t appeal to most of the “Green Zoners” here on CribChatter, due to the diversity of people here.”
    “having our kid be around “real” people and not just a bunch of spoiled rich kids and their douchey parents.”

    You talk a lot of shit, yet at the same time discriminate against a religion. I’m glad the diversity of my neighborhood mostly doesn’t include misguided arrogant dicks like yourself.

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  56. “The Church admits now that its decision to let homosexuals become priests … in the 60’s & 70’s was a big mistake.”

    “There was a homosexual problem, it is being addressed.”

    I hesitate to wade into this, but the *documented* abuse in Ireland and Canada well pre-dates the “60s & 70s”.

    And, before you start lecturing others on bigotry, I suggest a bit of reflection (eg “assuming they would remain “celibate”..yeah right”).

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  57. “Pederasty is a form of male homosexuality (even left-leaning Wikipedia agrees). The Church admits now that its decision to let homosexuals become priests (assuming they would remain “celibate”..yeah right) in the 60’s & 70’s was a big mistake. They are correcting the situation, but that entire generation of homosexuals must be purged out.”

    Are you saying that only homosexual priests are child molesters, or that straight priests don’t molest children?

    Good grief!

    I have very little respect for the catholic church, especially after hearing a co-worker’s story about her brother being offered $50,000 of hush money from the church that diddled him as a young boy. He refused the money and is going to take the church to task, south side church, hickory hills area, they are going through the trials now.

    Churches are nothing more thn a bunch of brainwashing, money theiving, tax dodging, gay hating hypocrites and I am glad that people are finally waking up to their nonsense!

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  58. ‘Pederasty is a form of male homosexuality (even left-leaning Wikipedia agrees). The Church admits now that its decision to let homosexuals become priests (assuming they would remain “celibate”..yeah right) in the 60’s & 70’s was a big mistake.’

    Hey Dan (Duncan), how was your summer man? I remember this almost verbatim statement you posted here last spring, the one that got me/us all banned for the day… think Sabrina was on vacation. I will mentally combine the image of what I imagine you to be, on that of Carrie Nation when I watch part two of ‘Prohibition’ tonight, and once again I’ll be reminded of all the good she/you have done by your *endless* moral crusades. Comforting to see that bitter old ladies are still alive and kicking.

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  59. I know that alot of haters would like to pin the sexual abuse on forthright white male catholic heterosexual believers, but that’s just not where the blame lies. The reality is, that due to PC concerns those straightforward hetero Catholics were basically silenced from criticizing the obviously flamer or predatory priests, lest someone like jay come along and call them an archie bunker. So, normal Catholics just remained quiet and passive with the new post-VaticanII regime, and look what happened.

    Again, however, it was a super-minority that was even exposed to the pederasty/homosexual perversion and it takes place with other religions, rabbis, religious schools, sports coaches (they are usually heterosexual predator though, ie. girls’ swim coach) and there even things like NAMBLA. The PC world we live in, in which everyone remains silent and “tolerant”, basically enables all of this stuff.

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  60. “The reality is, that due to PC concerns those straightforward hetero Catholics were basically silenced from criticizing the obviously flamer or predatory priests”

    In the ’20s? In western Canada and rural Ireland?

    Are you serious?

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  61. ‘and there even things like NAMBLA.’

    Dude, I have SO missed these ranrs of yours! Damn! One can only take so much of HD’s tinfoil hat predictions on exactly when the earth will swallow Lincoln Park if it refuses to offer $250k SF’s east of Halsted.

    You Dan, are my new Al Sharpton (circa 80’s), jacked-up on Mountain Dew at a Tawana Browley tent revival. More please!

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  62. “HD’s tinfoil hat predictions on exactly when the earth will swallow Lincoln Park if it refuses to offer $250k SF’s east of Halsted.”

    jay, you are much more like Duncan than you care to believe…

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  63. Yes- Duncan is Dan. He gives himself away every single time.

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  64. The asking price has been reduced to 179K.

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  65. “The asking price has been reduced to 179K.”

    Thanks for the update Milkster. I hope someone saves this house.

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  66. The listing apparently expired on 1/7/2012.
    It was relisted again yesterday, 3/8/2012 at 179K.

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  67. 4/4/2012
    Reduced to 169K

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  68. Milkster, you need to buy and save this home and have us all over (at least not those scared of the southside) when it is done!

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  69. Sold on 9/27/12 for 150K.

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  70. Just want to send hope and encouragement to the one who will fix up that house at 3558 S. Artesian. This neighborhood is a decent southwest side neighborhood that is improving. I have lived here my whole life being south side Irish. And I would love to see this building finished as it would have looked at it’s prime. Don’t give up on it. It’s a beautiful
    building.

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