Are Pre-War Units on the Outs? A 3-Bedroom at 3300 N. Lake Shore Drive in Lakeview

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This vintage 3-bedroom in 3300 N. Lake Shore Drive in Lakeview just came on the market.

The building was constructed in 1920 and has 84 units but no parking garage. Its age makes it a “pre-war” building.

The unit has some of its vintage features intact including a barrel ceiling in the entry foyer and plaster crown molding.

The listing says it also has a cedar closet.

It has lake views from the living room.

One of the hallmarks of vintage units are the large bedrooms and 2 out of the 3 bedrooms here are larger than you’d find in any modern construction.

Two bedrooms also have en suite baths.

The kitchen has maple cabinets, granite counter tops and stainless steel appliances.

This unit also has in-unit washer/dryer, installed in the half bath. It’s a rare feature in the building. Not all of the units have it.

There’s no central air or parking, but the listing says there’s a nearby indoor heated space available for $50,000.

Over the weekend, the New York Times had an article talking about how the pre-war “look” was out. Apparently, some home owners in New York City are stripping out vintage features, including crown molding, in the hope of modernizing these older units.

From the New York Times:

Millennials also “tend to be very conscious of the aesthetics and also the function” of finishes, said Jos Dudgeon, a principal of Tristate Sustainable, a general contractor in Manhattan. “Moldings, profiles, traditional cabinets — they’re not really interested in that. They’re really interested in something more modern and definitely more linear.”

For starters, crown molding is out — “I find it tends to close in the space, especially when you’re dealing with apartments,” said Mr. Dudgeon — and baseboards are becoming flatter, permitting the eyes to look up rather than being drawn downward.

“That’s definitely where you see a lot of the modern detailing,” said Andrew Mikhael, an architect who has spent the past five months overhauling a co-op in Park South Tower, a 1927 building in the Kips Bay section of Manhattan, for Diego Gomez and Jeanne Haney, a couple in their 40s. Some baseboards are flush to the wall, Mr. Mikhael said, while others feature what is known as a “gap reveal,” or “separation of wall and floor” that “creates a feeling that the wall is just floating.”

Fireplaces, often a showstopper in prewar apartments, are also looking more streamlined these days, thanks to the replacement of bulkier old surrounds with sleek new Carrara marble or granite. These are simpler than intricate millwork or mantels, Mr. Dudgeon said, “because the proportion of the space becomes more important,” say, for showcasing artwork.

And in an era when tidying up is a life-changing philosophy, the desire for built-in bookshelves and nooks for small items is waning. If clients request them at all, they’ll be “very clean” with a lot of square edges, single-panel Shaker-style doors, and narrow edge trims, Mr. Dudgeon said.

Housing trends usually start on the coasts and take 3 to 5 years to make their way to Chicago.

Is the pre-war apartment, and even its newer construction cousin like 9 W Walton in the Gold Coast which has “vintage” features, on the way “out”?

Amy Morro at Baird & Warner has the listing. See the pictures here.

Unit #4C: 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 1800 square feet

  • Sold in June 1998 for $190,000
  • Sold in December 2001 for $374,000
  • Sold in January 2005 for $460,000
  • Currently listed for $534,000
  • Assessments of $1056 a month (includes heat and scavenger)
  • Taxes of $7121
  • No central air
  • Washer/dryer in the unit
  • Heated garage parking is available nearby for $50,000
  • Bedroom #1: 17×13
  • Bedroom #2: 19×12
  • Bedroom #3: 10×8

22 Responses to “Are Pre-War Units on the Outs? A 3-Bedroom at 3300 N. Lake Shore Drive in Lakeview”

  1. I wouldn’t say pre-war is out or even vintage units, it is really more just the interior decorating that is out more than anything. Used to be colorful rooms, not everything is white or grey. Used to have big bulky leather furniture, not everything is sleeker/modern with fabrics. Major shift in design aesthetic from early 2000s to now.

    It is kind of like the shift to 80s decor of black granite/marble and glass block from the 60s/70s plaids/browns.

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  2. “traditional cabinets”

    ?? Meaning, cabinets with doors?

    “If clients request [built-in cases] at all, they’ll be “very clean” with a lot of square edges, single-panel Shaker-style doors, and narrow edge trims”

    ?? Have others been seeing a lot of ornate-ish built-in bookcases? I really only see “square edges, single-panel Shaker-style doors, and narrow edge trims” already.

    “Fireplaces, often a showstopper in prewar apartments”

    Who even wants a fireplace, regardless of the mantle design?? Sez the NYT 3 years ago: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/20/nyregion/in-new-york-that-dream-apartment-with-a-crackling-hearth-is-losing-some-spark.html?_r=0

    “a “gap reveal,” or “separation of wall and floor””

    This is cool, but (1) expensive to get done right, (2) potentially more likely to be damaged it not done *really* well, and (3) kinda a dust magnet, as there is a ‘hidden’ space for everything to collect.

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  3. Pre-War? Which war are they talking about? I would say mid-century is out, and also maybe pre-WWII, but definately not pre-WWI, which is more true vintage/classic. True vintage/classic will never be completely out. There will always be a segment of the population that appreciates true vintage detailing. Personally, I love the look of traditional vintage craftsmanship that just can’t be replicated today. With that said, the ideal home is vintage living rooms, dining rooms, but with renovated modern kitchens & bath.

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  4. The “gap reveal” will prove to be the tramp stamp of the interior design world.

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  5. ““gap reveal” will prove to be the tramp stamp of the interior design world.”

    Except that it is *super* easy to get rid of–just throw up some baseboard molding, and it’s as if it were never there.

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  6. I still don’t fully understand what a gap reveal is or what the point of it is

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  7. I’m thinking’ bout the Thong Song now…. And Jan Terri :)

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  8. “I still don’t fully understand what a gap reveal is”

    Couple different styles:

    1. Imagine a sheetrock wall, without any baseboard attached. Trim off the sheetrock say 1″ above the floor, and put a finished edge on it. wahlah.

    It’s usually done with a metal molding that serves as the finished edge of the rock, and covers the studs.

    2. Basically the same thing, but with a flush ‘baseboard’ (wood or rock) underneath the metal molding, making for a ‘notch’ say 3″ off the floor.

    You’ve undoubtedly been in a store or office that has it, but probably not noticed.

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  9. what the hell is the point of doing that?

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  10. “what the hell is the point of doing that?”

    It creates a feeling that the wall is just floating. Which is really cool when you’re high.

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  11. If it’s 1920’s or 30’s it’s “between wars.”

    The details on this and other upscale apartments of that era are marks of elegance and craftsmanship. They NEVER go out of style! Crown moldings, built-in bookshelves and hutches are all things that a good Reaktir can educate a buyer client to appreciate. On the other hand, nothing “dates” as quickly as a current year’s cutting-edge trend.

    Whoever buys this beautiful classic is making a wise investment.

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  12. A good Realtor…

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  13. Connectedspace on March 16th, 2017 at 7:31 am

    Uh huh. This cleanwalling thing is going to look like *trash* in ten years. Especially if it’s done on the cheap, as most of it will be. Most of the people in that puff piece NYT article wouldn’t know ‘clean’ design if it bit them on the ass. Theyre just watching some fabulous dude say ‘let’s open up this space’ on home reno shows, and nodding along with their mouths open.

    So we might see the destruction of beautiful, irreplaceable decor because a bunch of goons with giant televisions have absolutely no taste of their own.

    Disgusting.

    And I say this as a millennial from a world city nowhere near ‘heartland’ America.

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  14. Once again, Sabrina seizes upon the actions of a few idiots and tries to act like it’s the new normal. Are there drugs to make on less impressionable?

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  15. Glad those wacky millennials don’t dig pre-war units. More choice for me.

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  16. Some people like vintage, others don’t. Some like sleak lines and modularity, others like crown molding add ons and lots of tiny rooms. Some like open space. Some like urbanity and some like the country. But everyone thinks they have grear taste.

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  17. Laura Louzader on March 17th, 2017 at 6:35 pm

    “Some people like vintage, others don’t. Some like sleak lines and modularity, others like crown molding add ons and lots of tiny rooms. Some like open space. Some like urbanity and some like the country.”

    And they’re always buying each other’s properties, or some are clean-walling beautiful old places like this into blandness, while others are tricking out bland modern apartments with paneling and millwork and antiques.

    This place was built in 1925. It’s a great building, with relatively reasonable HOA per square foot for an antique high rise building. Great location, and beautiful apt with huge rooms.

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  18. Open House 1-3pm Sunday, March 19
    Come see this vintage gem,

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  19. Lake views from Master bedroom and En-suite bath.

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  20. “Once again, Sabrina seizes upon the actions of a few idiots and tries to act like it’s the new normal.”

    Huh? We’ve seen this modernist aesthetic in every new hotel, hotel lobby, rental building, etc. in every city in the entire world. It’s so totally homogenous. It is the new normal. I’m not sure why Sabrina doesn’t think it not already here.

    I was in Dublin and London recently, and it was horrifyingly boring, homogenous, the same as anywhere in the West. You don’t even really need to leave home. Same crap. Same bars & restaurants. Same decor. Chicago is behind the times on kebab shops though, but I’m sure we’ll soon be closing that wonderful globalist gap.

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  21. At the expense of “true”, first class vintage details as anything approaching a “new normal”? I think not. In new construction, or when renovating a trashed or worn out vintage place that wasn’t much to begin with? Sure, and, to your point, absolutely nothing new about the overall aesthetic.

    Agree on London, as unexotic as it gets.

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  22. “It is the new normal. I’m not sure why Sabrina doesn’t think it not already here.”

    The “new normal” is stripping out crown molding and built-ins in vintage units around the world?

    Huh.

    Never heard of that happening in Chicago before. Nor in Mexico City. Nor in New Orleans. Nor Charleston. Nor in San Francisco (beautiful Victorians there.) Never heard of someone buying a 120 year old beautiful brownstone in Brooklyn and taking out all those medallions and original fireplaces unless it was rotting and not savable.

    They are taking OUT the crown molding (instead of putting it in) in some of these NYC condos.

    Interestingly, here in Chicago (for those who actually live here and know)- the hottest building in the city (totally sold out new construction in the Gold Coast) has the vintage aesthetic, including herringbone floors. No “modern” there.

    So maybe Chicago is special? And pre-war isn’t “out”?

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